Articles


First ROBBY MÜLLER AWARD goes to Diego García

Rotterdam, 2019-10-30 - IFFR / NSC

The Robby Müller Award honours an ‘image maker’ who, in the spirit of the late Robby Müller, has created an authentic, credible and emotionally striking visual language throughout their oeuvre. The first award goes to Diego García and will be presented at the 49th International Film Festival Rotterdam.


The Circle of Film

Amsterdam, 2019-10-02 - Jean van de Velde

"Wil de Nederlandse filmcultuur overleven, dan zal de filmketen een filmketting moeten worden! Dan moet het einde van die keten (de filmexploitatie) aan het begin (de filmproductie) geklonken worden. Dan moeten de baten aan het einde de 'boost' voor een nieuw begin zijn."


Regisseurs naar de achterbank

Amsterdam, 2019-08-24 - Jos van der Burg & Karin Wolfs

“Doreen krijgt heel veel power.” Aldus waarnemend Filmfonds-directeur Ger Bouma tien jaar geleden over de benoeming van Doreen Boonekamp tot directeur. Anders dan haar voorgangers kreeg Boonekamp bij haar aantreden twee petten: ze werd zowel directeur als bestuurder van het Filmfonds.


New Deal NSC

Amsterdam, 2019-04-17 - NSC

Uit een NSC-enquête die in mei 2018 onder de leden is gehouden, was de belangrijkste conclusie dat het de DP’s frustreert dat ze hun werk niet optimaal kunnen uitvoeren. Daarom dit manifest met suggesties om het werkproces te veranderen.


Living the Light, at 75th Venice International Film Festival

Amsterdam, 2018-11-18 - Vincent Visser

Living the Light – Robby Müller, made by Claire Pijman NSC, will have its world premiere at the 75th Venice International Film Festival and is selected for the Venice Classics competition


Time Layers Come Together

Amsterdam, 2018-11-17 - Vincent Visser

'Paolo Ventura, Vanishing Man,’ shows how an Italian artist creates his own timeless melancholic world in a barn on an abandoned mountaintop in Italy. With paint, cardboard, and relics of a human life, he resonates his childhood’s memories and isolation by giving himself and found objects a new magical life.   


Frank van den Eeden about Waldstille

Amsterdam, - Vincent Visser

Dutch cinematographer Frank van den Eeden (May 14, 1971), resident of Antwerp is best known for his work with directors such as Fien Troch, Nanouk Leopold and Jan Verheyen. Besides many nominations he has won several awards for his work as cinematographer.  One of his later productions is ‘Waldstille’ from writer and director Martijn Maria Smits, a feature film that got its world-premiere during the San Sebastian Film Festival in 2016. The NSC talked with Frank about this film.


NSC Investigates Film Making Process in The Netherlands

Amsterdam, 2019-05-01 - NSC

The Netherlands Society of Cinematographers (NSC) conducted a survey among its members as a response to the Netherlands Film Production Incentive 2014-2017 evaluation.


The Cinematographer as Co-Author

Amsterdam, 2019-05-09 - Hans Beerekamp

While cleaning up his archive, film journalist Hans Beerekamp found several editions of the (small-scale published) Dutch film magazine Cineécri.


Emotional Shapes and Textures - Daniël Bouquet

Amsterdam, 2018-07-15 - Vincent Visser

Immediately after his graduation from the Dutch Film Academy in 2006, Daniël Bouquet made a flying start as Director of Photography. For his second feature length production “Nothing Personal” (2008) he won the Golden Calf award for best Cinematography during the Netherlands Film Festival in 2009. Nowadays he works mainly on a variety of international projects, amongst commercials for major brands like Adidas, Gillette and Vogue. The NSC talked with him about his career, interests and more.  


Beerified Scope

Amsterdam, 2018-11-16 - Vincent Visser

Joris Kerbosch (Culemborg, 1980) is best known for his work as cinematographer for directing duo Steffen Haars and Flip van der Kuil, for whom he shot the movies ‘New Kids Turbo’ (2010), ‘New Kids Nitro’ (2011) and ‘BROs BEFORE HOs’ (2013). ‘Ron Goossens, Low-Budget Stuntman,’ is their fourth feature film collaboration. Together those comedies where amongst the highest grossing films in The Netherlands and acclaimed international recognition. NSC spoke with cinematographer Joris Kerbosch about the film.

NSC Investigates Film Making Process in The Netherlands


Amsterdam, 2019-05-01 - NSC

The following is a re-edited English translated version of the original "Dutch Cinematographers Pass Judgement on Film-Making Process," analysis by Afdeling Filmzaken.

The Netherlands Society of Cinematographers (NSC) conducted a survey among its members as a response to the Netherlands Film Production Incentive 2014-2017 evaluation. (Read the results here). The aim was to find out whether the Film Fund's policy 'more money to less productions' and the Netherlands Film Production Incentive led to the intended changes in working conditions. The survey examines the relation between Film Fund, producers and creators. 

The following questions are central to the results of the survey. We first mention the outcome, in some cases followed by a summary made by Afdeling Filmzaken:

  • Is there a significant change in prep, shooting and post-production time for the DoP and other crew?
  • Is there a difference in approach of workflow?
  • Do we get more involved in projects coming from abroad?
  • Is the position of the DoP improved? Especially in relationship to the producer and line-producer, since the Film Fund considers producers as their most important sparring partner.

 

NSC-members and production-offices;

  • There is this Dutch ‘genetic’ problem: a tendency to aim for rules and regulations. Same goes for the Film Fund; too many rules.
  • Filmmakers (directors and screenplay writers) follow these rules too literally instead of following their own dreams and passion.
  • The necessity is disappearing by "follow the rules and get the money to make your film," approach.
  • Too much interference from one side and too little ambition and perseverance from the other side.

There are too many rules, also from the Film Fund. Directors and screenwriters follow these rules too strict instead of following their own dreams and passion.

 

Prep Days

  • The majority of cinematographers sees a decline in preparation time.
  • There is hardly any time to figure out the style and look of a project.
  • Prep with director and other heads of department is always too short.

There is hardly any time to determine the style and 'look' of the film.

 

Fee

  • No change at all. It's even became more difficult to get normal rates. Most of the times a producer offers a disproportionate flat fee which is not equal to the number of actual working days.
  • Rates have not changed over the last 10 years.
  • Experience is not a benchmark. Young people grow fast towards the standard rates. When this plateau is reached no difference is made between 5 or 25 years of experience.

Fees are the same for 10 years. 

  • Spending obligations within coproduction-projects often result in a mandatory cooperation with crew and rental companies. This can be a nice surprise, like working with a great gaffer one didn't know before.
  • But this also means you cannot work with the trusted people and companies you know well, which could save time and money.

Spending obligations mean that you can not cooperate with the people and companies you have a bond with, saving time and money.

 

Conclusions

  1. We notice no change in number of working days and rates since the introduction of the incentive.
  2. Almost every production starts too early with filming. The script is not ready yet or there's more time needed for preparation.
  3. DoP's are often the most experienced people on and around a film set. Please use that given fact!

Details make the difference. Finetuning the script, finding the right people (cast & crew), finding that specific location... That is the only way to distiguish the film. Please... give us more time... please!!! 

 

Summarized by Afdeling Filmzaken

Investigation shows that the policy line "more money for less films" and the Film Production Incentive;

  • Have not led to an improvement in preparation time, required need of shooting days and post-production time of a film. There is a general lack of time. This lack of time is so acute that the (artistic) quality of Dutch films have to suffer.
  • There is a gap in knowledge between cinematographers and the production staff so that ambitions can hardly be realized.
  • Cinematographers have hardly found work in foreign productions.
  • It is difficult to work with the crew and companies of your choice.
  • Cinematographers are not involved earlier in the process, as the rules prescribe.

The cinematographers sketch a rather disturbing picture of the creative process of a Dutch film. It is clear that it almost impossible to achieve quality with the ever cheaper and faster mentality.

What can filmmakers do about this?

Maybe it's time for directors, screenwriters, actors, art directors and editors to show what they need to achieve quality via their societies or the Afdeling Filmzaken-website. This is very important because only they know the demands for this. 

It is time that screenwriters, directors, actors, cinematographers, art directors and editors indicate how they can achieve quality. Nobody else can do that for them. If they don't, no one does it.